Eco Friendly Packaging

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One of the latest trends is to opt for eco-friendly packaging, and almost all of the top packaging companies offer some products that use eco-friendly materials. Opting for this type of packaging provides you with many benefits, including both obvious ones and those that most people do not consider.

Better for Environment

The most obvious benefit of eco-friendly packaging is in relation to the environment. Eco-friendly packaging is usually made from biobased or recycled materials, reducing the waste of natural resources in production. Additionally, the manufacturing process itself tends to be more efficient, further reducing resources used and minimizing the negative impact your company has on the environment. Even specific ingredients used for printing is free of heavy metals substances which harm the environment and are found in traditional inks.

Easy Disposal

In addition to minimizing the environmental impact when creating the product, eco-friendly packaging also tends to be better for the environment after it has served its purpose. Depending on the particular type of packaging you use, it will be recyclable or compostable. That means that if your customers have compost facilities, they can simply turn the discarded packaging into fuel for plants. If they don’t have a compost pile, they will be able to bury the remnants with the knowledge that they will biodegrade within a short period of time. In the case of recyclable packaging, the end user will simply have to use recycling bin so it can be reused.

Versatile

In addition to helping the environment, eco-friendly packaging is actually incredibly versatile, finding uses in every major industry that standard packaging is involved in. Whether you are looking to package baked goods, meats, produce, cosmetics, hospitality items, or electronic devices, there will be a type of eco-friendly packaging available to meet your needs.

No Harmful Plastics

Traditional packaging materials contain quantities of plastics, and this type of packaging contributes to global warming and other environmental concerns. By using eco-friendly packaging, you are able to reduce the plastic used as well as its harmful effects. Petrochemicals are part of most traditional plastics, and these require large amounts of energy during production, with most of it being from non-sustainable resources. When petrochemical products are discarded, they can litter parks, roads, and waterways. Worst of all, plastics and their petrochemicals have even been linked to health problems when used with food, an issue that never causes concern with eco-friendly packaging.

Improve Brand Image

A final benefit of eco-friendly packaging is the way that it improves your brand image. When clients learn that you use environmentally friendly resources, this will show them that you not only care about the environment, but also that you are a responsible company. This improved brand image will lead to an increase in sales, furthering your company’s profits.

 

Compostable bags for Garments / Apparel Packaging

There is one thing we cannot deny and that’s the fact that people have been pretty careless in the use of conventional plastics around the world, endangering the natural environment around us.

Conventional plastic recycling of flexible packaging is often not possible, as many packaging solutions cannot go into the recycling system. There are a number reasons for this including that flexible packages are difficult to collect and separate by both the consumer and the recycling facility. This is why composting with food waste as an alternative is increasingly being considered by major brands and retailers.

Plastic packaging is an issue. World wide people  discard 600 million tons of plastics year. The world’s population throws away enough annually to surround the Earth x4. Plastics are not only capable of releasing their toxins into the environment, but they will take a pretty long time to decompose.  On an average, we only recycle about 8% of the plastic we manufacture. Most of these products are made for a single use. (i.e. a straw or cup at a restaurant that’s used and thrown away.) Packaging is also major culprit. How many times do we eat a bag of chips or a chocolate bar and toss the plastic wrapper in the trash?”

It is important that you have to initiate effective waste management plan that incorporates all of your recycling and waste requirements. This not only means ensuring that waste is properly managed on-site, but that it is regularly collected and that it is properly disposed of on a regular basis.

When you start packing garments / apparel in compostable bags, which will keep millions of poly bags out of the landfill. With the switch, not only you are keeping plastic bags away but being carbon neutral – by closing loop into composting you are developing a rich humus which can be used as compost. We hope this will inspire others to think about ways to stop using plastic.

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coke plant bottle

Coke plant bottle is Plant-astic

coke plant bottle

coke plant bottle

coke plant bottle

coke plant bottle

Coca-Cola Produces World’s First 100% Plant-Based PET Bottle

Coca-Cola has produced the world’s first PET plastic bottle made entirely from plant materials.

PlantBottle packaging is Coke’s plant-based alternative to packaging traditionally made from fossil fuels and other non-renewable materials. PlantBottle packaging uses patented technology that converts natural sugars found in plants into the ingredients for making PET plastic bottles. The packaging looks, functions and recycles like traditional PET.

PlantBottle packaging can be used for a variety of packaging sizes and across water, sparkling, juice and tea beverage brands. Today, the company uses sugarcane and waste from the sugarcane manufacturing process to create PlantBottle packaging.

Since the 2009 PlantBottle launch, Coke has distributed more than 35 billion bottles in nearly 40 countries using its current version of PlantBottle packaging, made from up to 30 percent plant-based materials. The company estimates the use of PlantBottle packaging since launch has helped save the equivalent annual emissions of more than 315,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide.

There is however hope: BIOPLASTICS

biodegradable plastics

biodegradable plastics

biodegradable plastics

biodegradable plastics

biodegradable plastic bag

biodegradable plastic bag

Plastics are everywhere. Hermitically sealed from your television set to the lining of the Tetra Pak in your fridge, it has crept into our modern lifestyle and clenched its fist. Plastics has enabled great industrial leaps (such as life-saving medical devices) and simplified everyday life, but it has come at a cost.

Traditionally made from non-renewable fossil fuels, plastic is considered to be non-biodegradable (it takes several hundreds of years to break down), which wreaks havoc on the environment. Sadly, every piece of plastic ever made still exists today in one form or another: in the gut of an albatross cadaver or as the small amount that has been incinerated and has become toxic particulate matter. And it’s been around for 150 years. Furthermore, plastics can harm human health by leaching potentially toxic chemicals such as PCBs, antimony, derivatives of polystyrene, Bisphenol A (BPA, a hormone-disrupting chemical), as well as estrogen.

The perils of persistence:-

The culprit is our behavior of littering. The problem stems from the fact that traditional plastic doesn’t biodegrade. Disposable plastics are the largest source of plastic pollution. They end up polluting ecosystems as whole and killing individual creatures one by one. Turtles mistaking plastic bags for jellyfish, fish trapped in plastic packaging – the evidence is undeniable. Even humans aren’t immune to accidental ingestion; as plastics break down into smaller and smaller particles, they end up being eaten by fish, and voilà, they enter our food chain.

When plastic particles are hit by the sun’s UV-light, higher doses of toxic chemicals and BPA are leached, which eventually enter our bodies. BPA, widely used in food containers, water bottles and baby bottles, can leach into food and has been detected in the blood of pregnant women and in the lactating mothers. This means that babies are born with BPA already circulating in them.

Most of us have by now heard of the enormous plastic wasteland circulating in the northern Pacific Ocean. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch, discovered in the 1990s, is huge. Greenpeace estimates it to be roughly the size of the state of Texas, with six kilograms of plastic for every kilogram of natural plankton. Ocean and wind currents have carried pelagic plastic (and other debris) to rotate as one huge mass just below the surface. Similar gyres have also been found in the South Pacific, North and South Atlantic, and Indian Oceans, and minute particles abound in surrounding waters.

The oceans are not alone in becoming enormous plastic dumps. Deserts in the United Arab Emirates are collecting wind-blown garbage from Abu Dhabi, 19 per cent of which is plastic. Camels mistakenly ingest plastic bags; some estimate the death toll at 50 per cent of the natural population.

There is however hope in bioplastics, smart recycling and, most importantly, reducing consumption could ease the adverse effects.

From Fossil Fuel to Renewable Material:-

Making plastic begins with carbon from a fossil fuel such as petroleum. Therein lies problem number two: the depletion of fossil fuels. In an attempt to steer away from the use of non-renewable resources, biological sources such as vegetable fats and oils, starch and cellulose, or micro biota have started replacing them. Generally, this type of plastic is used for disposable items, but even long-lasting products can be obtained this way. The latter won’t biodegrade, but at least they are made from sustainable sources. The fact that disposable bioplastics can biodegrade also reduces the physical environmental burden.

Compared to petroleum-based plastic, this appears to the better alternative, though it opens a whole new discussion on the environmental effects of producing biodegradable and compostable plastics. The crops used for production need to be irrigated, fertilized, possibly treated with pesticides, transported, and processed. There also remains the reliance on petroleum to provide the energy to create bioplastics. Ideally, renewable energy could be used in most steps and agricultural by-products used instead of new crops specifically planted for this purpose.

But how well do these new plastics biodegrade? That depends on the polymer stability, temperature and available oxygen content. For a plastic to be labeled as biodegradable, it must meet the International Organization for Standardization’s (ISO) 17088, ASTM D 6400, EN 13432 & other international certifications definition of how quickly and to what extent a plastic must be degraded under commercial composting conditions. Most households can compost kitchen piles reducing the food waste to reach landfill.  Industrial composting units are needed to provide the tightly controlled conditions under which biodegradable plastics will effectively degrade into fine humous.

In general, it is considered that the production of bioplastics is more sustainable than conventional petroleum-derived plastics, mainly because it relies less on fossil fuels as a carbon source and results in reduced carbon dioxide emissions.

Reducing disposable plastic consumption:-

Fortunately, the use of biodegradable plastic and recycling are on the rise.

Nonetheless, most plastic waste is still landfilled, downcycled, incinerated, or even exported to other countries. Recycling of plastic is costly and does not adequately stem the production of new plastic products. Shockingly, the demand for used bottles is now outstripping supply in some areas, and certain cynical suppliers are now buying new, unused bottles directly from bottle-producing companies to make polyester textile fibres that can be labelled as recycled.

The biggest impact consumers can easily make, in the end, is to reduce their overall consumption of disposable plastics. Next time you shop for groceries, bring your own linen or BIODEGRADABLE bags. When buying take-out food, bring your own container and cutlery. Can’t stay away from coffee? Bring your own mug to be refilled. Challenge yourself by opting for the “least plastic” alternative. Websites such as www.ECOLIFELLC.com offer a variety of products to help you succeed on your mission.

“Stop the Drip –To Save the Drop”

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“Stop the Drip –To Save the Drop”

 Water is life’s mother and medium. It is – the elixir of life which makes life possible on earth, and that which makes earth unique amongst the other planes in our solar system. We are by all estimates 75% water, our brain in itself is 85% water! Without water there would be life and that is fact. It is the reason why we send missions to the moon, mars and other planets beyond searching, hoping that may be somewhere out there is another place like ours, special because it has water the sustainer of Life. But, the footprint of humanity has exceeded sustainable levels and due to this serous water depletion or pollution is taking place: rivers running dry, dropping of lake and ground water levels and endangered species because of contaminated water. I the population of around 7 billion plus people on our earth, 1 billion plus have no access to drinking water. Around 1000 children die a day due to sicknesses from drinking non-potable water. If we did nothing other than provide access to clean water, without any other medical intervention, we could save 2 million lives a year. The water and sanitation crisis claims more lives through disease than any war claims.

Whilst mankind has become a global consumer society, which unfortunately take less care of nature and natural resources; and applies without respect for nature, destroying the future of future generations. The water crisis is far more serious than the oil crisis. Freshwater is a scarce resource. Hence, mankind needs to learn to live collectively in harmony with nature.

Waste it once.… Pay for it Twice

OVER 1 ACRE OF RAINFOREST ARE DEFORESTED EVERY SECOND

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OVER 1 ACRE OF RAINFOREST ARE DEFORESTED EVERY SECOND

We need our world’s forest. They are vital sources of oxygen. They moderate our climates, prevent floods, and are our best defense against soil erosion. Forests recycle and purify our water. They are home to millions of plants and animals. We are losing’s Earth’s greatest biological treasures; Rainforests those once covered 14% of the earth’s land surface; now they cover a mere 6%. It took millions of years to turn rainforests into an incredibly beautiful and complex environments they are today; It has taken only a century of human intervention to destroy what nature designed to last forever.

What Can We Do?

We can reuse paper & wood products and use recycled paper whenever possible. We can support organizations involved in rainforest conservation.  A cultural shift towards a plant-based diet would be substantial step toward saving our remaining forests. It takes far less agricultural land to produce a plant-based diet. Since forests absorb carbon dioxide and produce oxygen, the movement towards a plant based diet would provide our children with more plentiful oxygen to breathe an atmosphere with fewer greenhouse gases, and a more stable climate.

Can We Turn Things Around? Perhaps. Perhaps Not

But, there is still time to turn things around if we act now it may dramatically perk up God’s wondrous creation that we care about and love. It would be like as if you were planting and tending a tree, helping to create a greener and healthier future for all generations to come.

SAVE TREE – SAVE ENVIRONMENT

Ecological Footprint

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ACT AS IF WHAT YOU” DO MAKES A DIFFERENCE.

Your Ecological Footprint approximates the area of land, air and ocean required to support your consumption of foods, goods, services, housing & energy  and assimilate your waste. Ever wondered how much “Ecolife” your lifestyle requires? IT’s easy to disregard that the choices we make every day can change how much natural resources we use. What you ear, how your family travels and even the clothes you wear all make a difference. How big is your ecological foot print?

* How many times you have been told to turn off the TV when you’re not watching it?

* Have you reminded anyone to recycle paper or cardboard?

* In a world with billions of people, does it really matter if you leave the water ON when you brush your teeth? Even if it doesn’t feel like it, little things do add up.

 REDUCE YOUR CARBON FOOT PRINT.

We know that protecting the environment is importanat; and there anre many simple wayts to reduce your impact on the Earth like: Using cleaner transport, adding energy saving features to your home, adopting energy saving habits, reducing your food foot print, adopting water saving habits, reducing your housing footprint and reducing your goods and service gootpirnt.

But don’t stop there. Amplify your impact by encouraging others to follow your lead.

NOW, ACT AS IF WHAT YOU DO MAKES A DIFFERENCE”…..BECAUSE IT DOES”